The Massachusetts Model System for Educator Evaluation ...

The Massachusetts Model System for Educator Evaluation ...

Educator Evaluation Workshop: S.M.A.R.T. Goals & Educator Plan Development MSSAA Summer Institute July 26, 2012 Agenda S.M.A.R.T. Goals o The role of goals in the 5-Step Cycle o Two types of goals o Why team goals? S.M.A.R.T.er Goals = Educator Plans o What makes a goal S.M.A.R.T.er? o Guided practice: turning goals into plans

Tips & Strategies Resources 2 Intended Outcomes Understand the rationale and framework for the MA SMARTer Goal model Be able to identify characteristics of S.M.A.R.T and S.M.A.R.T.er goals Be able to translate a SMARTer goal into an Educator Plan Identify at least one key strategy to take back to your school that will facilitate goal-setting and plan development Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 3 5 Step Evaluation Cycle

Foundation for the Framework & Model Every educator is an active participant in an evaluation Process promotes collaboration and continuous learning 4 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 5-Step Cycle in Action: 9th Gr Biology Teacher Teacher proposes 1 9th Gr Biology teacher identifies two needs:

scientific reading and writing and incorporating new curricular standards into his instruction. Teacher earns one of 4 ratings based on performance against the standards and progress on goals Department head meets with team and teacher to review evidence

and assess progress on goals, adjusting student learning goal and one team professional practice goal. His department head helps refine the goals before approving the goals & plan. Continuous Learning Teacher gathers and synthesizes evidence on goal progress, while

department head and principal focus data collection 5 on goal areas. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education S.M.A.R.T. Goals 6 How to begin? A thoughtful self-assessment leads to targeted, results-oriented goals. 7

The Power of EducatorDriven, Targeted Action Formative Assessment Monitoring progress and making needed adjustments Collection of evidence and documentation demonstrating improvements in professional practice and student growth 8

Step 2: Analysis, Goal Setting and Plan Development Educators set at least two goals: o Student learning goal o Professional practice goal (Aligned to the Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching and/or Administrative Leadership Practice) Educators are required to consider team goals Evaluators have final authority over goals 9 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Data as a Starting Point for Student Learning Goals Incoming Student Data how did these students do last year? Are there any anomalies

or subgroups that require specific attention? Past Student Data how have your students typically performed in the past? Aggregate Student Data are there any trends in performance, positive or negative, that characterize students in your school, content area, and/or grade level? 10 Rubrics as a Starting Point for Professional Practice Goals Principal Rubric At-a-Glance I. Instructional II. Leadership Management & Operations

III. Family & Community Engagement IV. Professional Culture A. Curriculum A. Environment A. Engagement A. Commitment to High Standards B. Instruction

B. HR Management & Development B. Sharing Responsibility B. Cultural Proficiency C. Asssessment C. Scheduling & Management Information Systems C. Communication

C. Communications D. Evaluation D. Law, Ethics & Policies D. Family Concerns E. Data-Informed Decisionmaking E. Fiscal Systems D. Continuous Learning

E. Shared Vision 11 S.M.A.R.T. Goals Specific and Strategic Measurable Action Oriented Rigorous, Realistic and Resultsfocused (the 3 Rs) T = Timed and Tracked S = M= A = R =

12 What Makes a Goal S.M.A.R.T.? Individually: Read What Makes a Goal S.M.A.R.T.? Underline one phrase that you find most significant in the reading Turn to a partner: Share your phrases Discuss the phrases that emerged and any insights about the document 13 S.M.A.R.T.er Goals = Educator Plans

14 A Massachusetts SMARTer GOAL = A Goal Statement + Key Actions + Benchmarks (Process & Outcome) = The Heart of the Educator Plan Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 15 Process and Outcome

Benchmarks Process benchmarks monitor plan implementation Outcome benchmarks monitor effectiveness of the plan 16 Guided Practice: A Principals Observations and Feedback Goal Statement for Classroom Observation & Feedback: I will manage my time more effectively in order to increase the frequency and impact of classroom observations by learning how to do 10-minute observations and conducting eight visits with feedback per week, on average.

17 (Aligned to I.D.2 (Observations & Feedback)) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Guided Practice In pairs: 1. Review the key actions (are they tightly linked to the goal?) 2. Review benchmarks: are there process benchmarks (actions done)? outcome benchmark(s) (results)? 3. Identify two revisions and/or additions to the actions and/or benchmarks that will make this SMART Goal

S.M.A.R.T.er Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 18 Guided Practice: A Principals Observations and Feedback Goal Statement for Classroom Observation & Feedback: I will manage my time more effectively in order to increase the frequency and impact of classroom observations by learning how to do 10-minute observations and by the start of second semester conducting eight visits with feedback per week, on average, that an increasing

percentage of teachers report are useful beginning with at least 60%. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 19 Principal Educator Plan Example Sample Professional Practice Goal for a Principal: I will manage my time more effectively in order to increase the frequency and impact of classroom observations by learning how to do 10-minute observations with feedback, and by the start of the second semester, conducting eight visits per week, on average, that an increasing percentage of teachers report are useful. Student Learning Goal(s) and Professional Practice Goal(s) Planned Activity Action Supports/ Resources from School/District 1. By September 1, I will develop a

schedule and method for logging at least eight classroom observations with feedback per week between October 15th and Memorial Day. 2. By October 15th, I will study with a colleague principals and my administrative team how to conduct 10 minute unannounced observations and write brief, useful feedback. 3. By January 1st, I will share at least 5 samples of feedback with principal colleagues and collect their feedback. 4. By January and again on June 1, I will solicit anonymous feedback from teachers about their perceptions of the usefulness of the unannounced visits and feedback. Superintendent

to facilitate teams of principals to collaborate on enhancing the observation and feedback process. Superintendent will help identify teams and provide scheduled time to hold study groups and conduct feedback Timeline/Benchmark or

Frequency 1. September 1 schedule developed January 15/March 15/May 15 check in to determine of 8 observations per week (on average) have been completed. 2. October 15th documented study time with colleague 3. January 1st 5 feedback samples will be shared with colleagues 4. January 1st and June 1st will 20 have collected feedback via teachers regarding their perceived value of the process. *Evidence provided through principals logs and example

Process and Outcome Benchmarks Process benchmarks monitor plan implementation o January 15/March 15/May 15 check in to determine if 8 observations per week (on average) have been completed. Outcome benchmarks monitor effectiveness of the plan o January 1st and June 1st will have collected feedback via teachers regarding their perceived value of the process. 21 Four Types of Educator Plans Developing Educator Plan

For educators without Professional Teaching status, administrators in the first three years in a district, or at the discretion of an evaluation for an educator in a new assignment Self-Directed Growth Plan For experienced educators rated proficient or exemplary on their last evaluation; these plans can be one or two years in length Directed Growth Plan For educators rated in need of improvement of on their last evaluation Improvement Plan For educators rated unsatisfactory on their last evaluation Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 22

Educator Plans: Requirements and Timelines Self-Directed Rated Proficient or Exemplary Growth Plan Directed Growth Plan Improvemen t Plan Developing Educator Plan o 1- or 2-year plan o developed by the educator Rated Needs Improvement o 1-year plan or less o developed by the educator &

evaluator Rated as Unsatisfactory o At least 30 calendar days; up to 1 23 year o developed by the evaluator Without Professional Status Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Educator Plan Cheat Sheet Formative Assessment/Evaluation: o Formative Assessments: plans that are 1-year or less in duration, mid-cycle check-in on goals o Formative Evaluations: 2-year plans, occur end-ofyear, ratings default to previous Summative Rating unless evidence indicates significant change

Student learning goals lend themselves to oneyear goals IPDPs can be merged into educator plans (see revised licensure regulations) 24 Tips & Strategies 25 Where to begin? Strategy 1: Aligned Goals District Goals School Goals Team Goals The Power of Teacher Goals Concerted

Action 26 Strategy 1: Aligned Goals An Example District Goal Anti-Bullying Initiative School Support the behavioral health Improvement Goal needs of all students. Standard/ Indicator School Administrator

Team Goal During the 2011 2012 school year, the HS Administrative Team will review and refine protocols in an effort to reach 100% consistency in administrating policy to support students social/ emotional/behavioral needs. II.A (Environmen t) Teacher Goal During the 2011-2012 school year, I will learn and appropriately use an increasing number of effective

rituals, routines and responses that prevent most behaviors that interfere with student learning. II.B (Learning Environment27 ) Where to begin? Strategy 2: Focus the SelfAssessment Murkland ES School leaders aligned District Core Issues and School Improvement Goals to specific parts of the rubric Led to focused and coherent self-assessment and goal-setting processes for all educators, Promoted collaboration and shared accountability throughout the school

not just one more thing but something were already doing Note: all Standards and Indicators are still important. This is about focusing and prioritizing to support coherence and doability Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 28 Teacher Rubric-at-a-Glance Think of one major initiative or focus in your school for 2012-2013. Using the teacher rubric at-a-glance, identify two Indicators (or elements) that you would most likely focus on with teachers related to this initiative. (Ex: Revised MA Curricular Frameworks) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

29 Where to begin? Strategy 3: Promote Team Goals Districts that promote team goals have found this work more doable Team goals support collaboration, communication, and likelihood of success (admin teams too!) Tips & Strategies Promote school or district goals Support regular team time Identify common process & benchmark outcomes

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 30 Where to begin? Strategy 4: Backward Mapping Start with the PD you have planned what do you expect your teachers to accomplish this year? Locate these objectives in the rubric and let those drive the self-assessment and goal-setting processes back at your school Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 31 Next Steps Suggestions for

Principals Review SMART Goal Setting and assess how SMART your current school improvement goals are. Read School-Level Planning & Implementation Guide (Part II of the Model System) and the School-Level Administrator Rubric (Part III, Appendix B) Locate your school improvement focus areas in the Administrator and Teacher rubric Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 32 Resources Massachusetts Model System for

Educator Evaluation 33 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education School-Level Planning & Implementation Guide Content Overview The Massachusetts Model System for Educator Evaluation Step 1: Self-Assessment Step 2: Goal Setting and Plan Development Step 3: Implementation of the Plan Step 4: Formative Assessment and Evaluation Step 5: Summative Evaluation Appendices: Forms for Educator Evaluation, Setting SMART Goals Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

34 ESE Evaluation Resources Whats coming? Summer 2012 Guidance on District-Determined Measures Training Modules with facilitator guides, PowerPoint presentations, and participant handouts List of approved vendors Updated website with new Resources section Newsletter 35 Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education ESE Evaluation Resources Whats coming? Fall/Winter 2012 Solicit and review feedback on Model System; update

Research & develop student and staff feedback instruments Collect and disseminate best practices Collect and vet assessments to build a repository of district measures Internal collaboration to support cross-initiative alignment EX: Support for use of rubric for teachers of ELLs aligned to RETELL initiative Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 36 Overview of Training Modules Module 1: Overview Module 2: Unpacking the Rubric Module 3: Self-Assessment Module 4: S.M.A.R.T. Goals and Educator Plan Development Module 5: Gathering Evidence Module 6: Observations and Feedback

Module 7: Rating Educator Performance Module 8: Rating Impact on Student Learning 37 For More Information and Resources: Visit the ESE educator evaluation website: www.doe.mass.edu/edeval Contact ESE with questions and suggestions: [email protected] Presenters: Claire Abbott [email protected] Preeya Pandya [email protected] Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 38

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